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Wine has been made in the Provence region for at least 2,600 years, ever since the ancient Greeks founded the city of Marseille in about 600 BC. Throughout the region’s history, viticulture and winemaking have been influenced by the various cultures that have been present in Provence, which include the Greeks, Romans, Gauls, and Catalans. These diverse groups introduced a large variety of grapes to the region, including grape varieties of Greek and Roman origin as well as Spanish, Italian and traditional French wine grapes.

Red WineWhite WineRosé Wine
The Provence region makes many excellent, full bodied red wines which account for about a third of the regional production. The Mourvèdre grape variety is the primary component in most red wines, but it is also often blended with Grenache. Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah are rising in prominence too, though some traditional Provençal winemakers view those grapes with suspicion.
White wine is produced in small quantities throughout the region with the Appellation d’origine contrôlée region of Cassis specialising in white wine production. The major white wine grapes of Provence include the Rhône varieties of Marsanne, Bourboulenc, Clairette, Grenache blanc, and Viognier as well as Chardonnay, Sauvignon blanc, and Semillon.
Today the region is best known for its rosé wine which makes up more than half of the regional production. Production of these wines involves the blend of the Mourvèdre and Cinsault varieties, with the latter being used as a significant component in most rosé. For the last century, Carignan has been a major grape but as more producers aim for improved quality the use of this high yielding variety has decreased. Other significant grape varieties, used primarily in blending, include Braquet, Folle, and Calitor.